Category: Terminal Services


RDS installation and HA procedure(s):

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/remote/remote-desktop-services/rds-scale-rdsh-farm

https://www.microsoftpressstore.com/articles/article.aspx?p=2346349&seqNum=4

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/remote/remote-desktop-services/rds-connection-broker-cluster

https://msfreaks.wordpress.com/2013/12/09/windows-2012-r2-remote-desktop-services-part-1

https://msfreaks.wordpress.com/2013/12/23/windows-2012-r2-remote-desktop-services-part-2

https://msfreaks.wordpress.com/2013/12/26/windows-2012-r2-remote-desktop-services-part-3

https://ryanmangansitblog.com/tag/high-availability/

Technet forum: https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-us/home?forum=winserverts

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Introduction:

Event forwarding (also called SUBSCRIPTIONS) is a mean to send Windows event log entries from source computers to a collector. A same computer can be a collector or a source.

There are two methods available to complete this challenge – collector initiated and source initiated:

Parameter Collector Initiated (PULL) Source Initiated (PUSH)
Socket direction (for firewall rules) Collector –> Source Collector –> Source
Initiating machine Collector Source
Authentication Type Kerberos Kerberos / Certificates

This technology uses WinRM (HTTP protocol on port TCP 5985 with WinRM 2.0) . Be careful with the Window firewall and configure it to allow WinRM incoming requests.

WinRM is the ‘server’ component and WinRS is the ‘client’ that can remotely manage the machine with WinRM configured.

Differences you should be aware of:

WinRM 1.1 (obsolete)
Vista and Server 2008
Port 80 for HTTP and Port 443 for HTTPS

WinRM 2.0
Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2, 2012 R2 …
Port 5985 for HTTP and Port 5986 for HTTPS

Reference for WEF and event forwarding:

Deploying WinRM using Group Policy: http://www.vkernel.ro/blog/how-to-enable-winrm-http-via-group-policy

Microsoft official document well documented:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/threat-protection/use-windows-event-forwarding-to-assist-in-instrusion-detection

https://www.jpcert.or.jp/english/pub/sr/ir_research.html

Fresh How-to from Intrusion detection perspective:

https://medium.com/@palantir/windows-event-forwarding-for-network-defense-cb208d5ff86f

How-to easy to follow from Intrusion detection perspective:

https://www.root9b.com/sites/default/files/whitepapers/R9B_blog_005_whitepaper_01.pdf

https://joshuadlewis.blogspot.fr/2014/10/advanced-threat-detection-with-sysmon_74.html same than previous one but more appendix

From Intrusion detection perspective:

https://hackernoon.com/the-windows-event-forwarding-survival-guide-2010db7a68c4 help to manage error of WEF deployment

Basic configuration:

on source computers and collector computer:  winrm quickconfig     and add the collector computer account to the local administrators group

To verify a listener has been created type winrm enumerate winrm/config/listener

WinRM Client Setup

Just to round off this quick introduction to WinRM, to delete a listener use winrm delete winrm/config/listener?address=*+Transport=HTTP

on collector computer: wecutil qc. Add the computer account of the collector computer to the Event Log Readers Group on each of the source computers

on collector computer: create a new subscription from event viewer (follow the wizard)

WinRS: WinRS (Windows Remote Shell) is the client that connects to a WinRM configured machine (as seen in the first part of this post). WinRS is pretty handy, you’ve probably used PSTools or SC for similar things in the past. Here are a few examples of what you do.

Connecting to a remote shell
winrs -r:http://hostnameofclient "cmd"
Stop / Starting remote service
winrs -r:http://hostnameofclient "net start/stop spooler"
Do a Dir on the C drive
winrs -r:http://hostnameofclient "dir c:\"

WinRS

Forwarded Event Logs:

This is configured using ‘subscribers’, which connect to WinRM enabled machines.

To configure these subscribers head over to event viewer, right click on forwarded events and select properties. Select the 2nd tab along subscriptions and press create.

This is where you’ll select the WinRM enabled machine and choose which events you would like forwarded.

Subscriptions

Right click the subscription and select show runtime status.

Error 0x80338126

Now it took me a minute or two to figure this one out. Was it a firewall issue (this gives the same error code), did I miss some configuration steps? Well no, it was something a lot more basic than that. Remember earlier on we were talking about the port changes in WinRM 1.1 to 2.0?

That’s right, I was using server 2008 R2 to set the subscriptions which automatically sets the port to 5985. The client I configured initially was server 2008 so uses version 1.1. If you right click the subscription and click properties -> advanced you’ll be able to see this. I changed this to port 80 and checked the runtime status again.

[DC2.domain.local] – Error – Last retry time: 03/02/2011 20:20:30. Code (0x5): Access is denied. Next retry time: 03/02/2011 20:25:30.”

Head back to the advanced settings and change the user account from machine account to a user with administrative rights. After making these changes the forwarded events started to flow.

Subscriptions Advanced

Additional considerations:

In a workgroup environment, you can follow the same basic procedure described above to configure computers to forward and collect events. However, there are some additional steps and considerations for workgroups:

  • You can only use Normal mode (Pull) subscriptions
  • You must add a Windows Firewall exception for Remote Event Log Management on each source computer.
  • You must add an account with administrator privileges to the Event Log Readers group on each source computer. You must specify this account in the Configure Advanced Subscription Settings dialog when creating a subscription on the collector computer.
  • Type winrm set winrm/config/client @{TrustedHosts="<sources>"} at a command prompt on the collector computer to allow all of the source computers to use NTLM authentication when communicating with WinRM on the collector computer. Run this command only once. Where <sources> appears in the command, substitute a list of the names of all of the participating source computers in the workgroup. Separate the names by commas. Alternatively, you can use wildcards to match the names of all the source computers. For example, if you want to configure a set of source computers, each with a name that begins with “msft”, you could type this command winrm set winrm/config/client @{TrustedHosts="msft*"} on the collector computer. To learn more about this command, type winrm help config.

If you configure a subscription to use the HTTPS protocol by using the HTTPS option in Advanced Subscription Settings , you must also set corresponding Windows Firewall exceptions for port 443. For a subscription that uses Normal (PULL mode) delivery optimization, you must set the exception only on the source computers. For a subscription that uses either Minimize Bandwidth or Minimize Latency (PUSH mode) delivery optimizations, you must set the exception on both the source and collector computers.

If you intend to specify a user account by using the Specific User option in Advanced Subscription Settings when creating the subscription, you must ensure that account is a member of the local Administrators group on each of the source computers in step 4 instead of adding the machine account of the collector computer. Alternatively, you can use the Windows Event Log command-line utility to grant an account access to individual logs. To learn more about this command-line utility, type wevtutil sl -? at a command prompt.

References:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/jepayne/archive/2015/11/24/monitoring-what-matters-windows-event-forwarding-for-everyone-even-if-you-already-have-a-siem.aspx

http://blogs.technet.com/b/jepayne/archive/2015/11/20/what-should-i-know-about-security-the-massive-list-of-links-post.aspx

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc748890.aspx

http://windowsitpro.com/security/q-what-are-some-simple-tips-testing-and-troubleshooting-windows-event-forwarding-and-collec

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc749140.aspx

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askperf/archive/2010/09/24/an-introduction-to-winrm-basics.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa384372(v=vs.85).aspx

Video:

Tutorials:

1st: Event forwarding between computers in a Domain

http://tutorial.programming4.us/windows_7/Forwarding-Events-(part-1)—How-to-Configure-Event-Forwarding-in-AD-DS-Domains.aspx

2nd: Event forwarding between computers in workgroup

http://tutorial.programming4.us/windows_7/Forwarding-Events-(part-2)—How-to-Troubleshoot-Event-Forwarding—How-to-Configure-Event-Forwarding-in-Workgroup-Environments.aspx

Additional article talking about Event forwarding too:

http://joshuadlewis.blogspot.fr/2014/10/advanced-threat-detection-with-sysmon_74.html

 

View story at Medium.com

Some interesting sites:

Reference articles to secure a Windows domain:

https://github.com/PaulSec/awesome-windows-domain-hardening

Microsoft audit Policy settings and recommendations:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/identity/ad-ds/plan/security-best-practices/audit-policy-recommendations

Sysinternals sysmon:

https://onedrive.live.com/view.aspx?resid=D026B4699190F1E6!2843&ithint=file%2cpptx&app=PowerPoint&authkey=!AMvCRTKB_V1J5ow

On ADsecurity.org:

Beyond domain admins: https://adsecurity.org/?p=3700

Gathering AD data with PowerShell: https://adsecurity.org/?p=3719

Hardening Windows computers, secure Baseline check list: https://adsecurity.org/?p=3299

Hardening Windows domain, secure Baseline check list:

Securing Domain Controllers to Improve Active Directory Security

 

Download sysmon:

NEW: Sysmon 6.10 is available ! : https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/sysmon  and how to use it:

NEW: WMI detections: https://rawsec.lu/blog/posts/2017/Sep/19/sysmon-v610-vs-wmi-persistence/

Installation and usage:

List of web resources concerning Sysmon: https://github.com/MHaggis/sysmon-dfir

Sysmon events table: https://rawsec.lu/blog/posts/2017/Sep/19/sysmon-events-table/

Mark russinovitch’s RSA conference: https://onedrive.live.com/view.aspx?resid=D026B4699190F1E6!2843&ithint=file%2cpptx&app=PowerPoint&authkey=!AMvCRTKB_V1J5ow

Sysmon config files explained:

https://github.com/SwiftOnSecurity/sysmon-config

https://github.com/ion-storm/sysmon-config/blob/master/sysmonconfig-export.xml

https://www.bsk-consulting.de/2015/02/04/sysmon-example-config-xml/

View story at Medium.com

Else other install guides:

Sysinternals Sysmon unleashed

http://www.darkoperator.com/blog/2014/8/8/sysinternals-sysmon

 

Detecting APT with Sysmon:

https://www.rsaconference.com/writable/presentations/file_upload/hta-w05-tracking_hackers_on_your_network_with_sysinternals_sysmon.pdf

https://www.jpcert.or.jp/english/pub/sr/ir_research.html

https://www.root9b.com/sites/default/files/whitepapers/R9B_blog_005_whitepaper_01.pdf

Sysmon with Splunk:

http://blogs.splunk.com/2014/11/24/monitoring-network-traffic-with-sysmon-and-splunk/

https://securitylogs.org/tag/sysmon/

Sysmon log analyzer/parsing sysmon event log:

https://github.com/CrowdStrike/Forensics/blob/master/sysmon_parse.cmd

https://digital-forensics.sans.org/blog/2014/08/12/sysmon-in-malware-analysis-lab

https://github.com/JamesHabben/sysmon-queries

http://blog.crowdstrike.com/sysmon-2/

WEF: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/threat-protection/use-windows-event-forwarding-to-assist-in-instrusion-detection

logparser: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/confirmation.aspx?id=24659

logparser GUI: http://lizard-labs.com/log_parser_lizard.aspx

Web article:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc784450(v=ws.10).aspx

 

How to test SSL/TLS:

You can easily see what SSL protocol a server supports (and even grab the certificate from there) example below with openSSL:

openssl s_client -connect myserver.mydomain.local:636 -ssl3
openssl s_client -connect myserver.mydomain.local:636 -tls1
openssl s_client -connect myserver.mydomain.local:636 -tls1_1
openssl s_client -connect myserver.mydomain.local:636 -tls1_2

All those reports successfull connection SSL handshake and present the proper server certificate.

And it is very easy anyway for a client to get supported SSL protocols on a remote server, it is how client <==> server handshake works to
select an agreed protocol supported on both sides.

I suggest you check on application side …

# nmap –script ssl-enum-ciphers -p 636 myserver.mydomain.local

Starting Nmap 6.46 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2017-02-16 18:22 CET
Nmap scan report for myserver.mydomain.local (172.19.133.64)
Host is up (0.025s latency).
PORT STATE SERVICE
636/tcp open ldapssl
| ssl-enum-ciphers:
| SSLv3:
| ciphers:
| TLS_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA – strong
| TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_MD5 – strong
| TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA – strong
| compressors:
| NULL
| TLSv1.0:
| ciphers:
| TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA – strong
| TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA – strong
| TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA – strong
| TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA – strong
| TLS_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA – strong
| TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA – strong

 

You can manage users, sessions, processes, and terminal servers by using command-line utilities:

for w2k8/w2k8-r2: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc725766(WS.10).aspx

 

Command Description
Change Changes Remote Desktop Session Host (RD Session Host) server settings for logons, COM port mappings, and install mode.
Change logon Enables or disables logons from client sessions on an RD Session Host server, or displays current logon status.
Change port Lists or changes the COM port mappings to be compatible with MS-DOS applications.
Change user Changes the install mode for the RD Session Host server.
Chglogon Enables or disables logons from client sessions on an RD Session Host server, or displays current logon status.
Chgport Lists or changes the COM port mappings to be compatible with MS-DOS applications.
Chgusr Changes the install mode for the RD Session Host server.
Flattemp Enables or disables flat temporary folders.
Logoff Logs off a user from a session on an RD Session Host server and deletes the session from the server.
Msg Sends a message to a user on an RD Session Host server.
Mstsc Creates connections to RD Session Host servers or other remote computers.
Qappsrv Displays a list of all RD Session Host servers on the network.
Qprocess Displays information about processes that are running on an RD Session Host server.
Query Displays information about processes, sessions, and RD Session Host servers.
Query process Displays information about processes that are running on an RD Session Host server.
Query session Displays information about sessions on an RD Session Host server.
Query termserver Displays a list of all RD Session Host servers on the network.
Query user Displays information about user sessions on an RD Session Host server.
Quser Displays information about user sessions on an RD Session Host server.
Qwinsta Displays information about sessions on an RD Session Host server.
Rdpsign Enables you to digitally sign a Remote Desktop Protocol (.rdp) file.
Reset session Enables you to reset (delete) a session on an RD Session Host server.
Rwinsta Enables you to reset (delete) a session on an RD Session Host server.
Shadow Enables you to remotely control an active session of another user on an RD Session Host server.
Tscon Connects to another session on an RD Session Host server.
Tsdiscon Disconnects a session from an RD Session Host server.
Tskill Ends a process running in a session on an RD Session Host server.
Tsprof Copies the Remote Desktop Services user configuration information from one user to another.

Tips and tricks:

To query and list the sessions on the remote session, you could use QUser.exe or QWinsta:

C:>QUERY USER [username | sessionname | sessionid] [/SERVER:servername]

QWinsta is little different and better. It has more features and options. It comes with all flavors of Windows:

C:>qwinsta /?
Display information about Terminal Sessions.

QUERY SESSION [sessionname | username | sessionid]
[/SERVER:servername] [/MODE] [/FLOW] [/CONNECT] [/COUNTER]

Logoff command kicks off (logging off) the specified remote session:

C:>logoff /?
Terminates a session.

LOGOFF [sessionname | sessionid] [/SERVER:servername] [/V]

RWinsta has same parameters and does same thing as log off command. It simply means Reset WINdows STAtion:

C:>RWinsta /?
Reset the session subsytem hardware and software to known initial values.

RESET SESSION {sessionname | sessionid} [/SERVER:servername] [/V]

 

 

Remotely enable PSRemoting and Unrestricted PowerShell Execution using PsExec and PSSession, then run PSRecon

Option 1 — WMI:
PS C:\> wmic /node:”10.10.10.10″ process call create “powershell -noprofile -command Enable-PsRemoting -Force” -Credential Get-Credential

Option 2 – PsExec:
PS C:\> PsExec.exe \\10.10.10.10 -u [admin account name] -p [admin account password] -h -d powershell.exe “Enable-PSRemoting -Force”

Next…

PS C:\> Test-WSMan 10.10.10.10
PS C:\> Enter-PSSession 10.10.10.10
[10.10.10.10]: PS C:\> Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted -Force

Then…

Option 1 — Execute locally in-memory, push evidence to a share, and lock the host down:
[10.10.10.10]: PS C:\> IEX (New-Object Net.WebClient).DownloadString(‘https://github.com/gfoss/PSRecon/psrecon.ps1&#8217;)
[10.10.10.10]: PS C:\> Copy-Item PSRecon_* -Recurse [network share]
[10.10.10.10]: PS C:\> rm PSRecon_* -Recurse -Force
[10.10.10.10]: PS C:\> Invoke-Lockdown; exit

Option 2 — Exit PSSession, execute PSRecon remotely, send the report out via email, and lock the host down:
[10.10.10.10]: PS C:\> exit
PS C:\> .\psrecon.ps1 -remote -target 10.10.10.10 -sendEmail -smtpServer 127.0.0.1 -emailTo greg.foss[at]logrhythm.com -emailFrom psrecon[at]logrhythm.com -lockdown

Be careful! This will open the system up to unnecessary risk!!
You could also inadvertently expose administrative credentials when authenticating to a compromised host.
If the host isn’t taken offline, PSRemoting should be disabled along with disallowing Unrestricted PowerShell execution following PSRecon

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askds/archive/2008/08/12/event-logging-policy-settings-in-windows-server-2008-and-vista.aspx

Windows XP/2003/2012 and greater support drive mapping back to the client workstation during a Terminal Services (Remote Desktop) session. This means you can copy files from the server to the client and vice versa.

Each volume (removable, fixed or network) available on the client workstation is mapped (A for drive A:, C for drive C:, X for drive X: etc) and the remote Terminal Services session inherits the user’s permission. So if you are logged on to the workstation as user A and you log in to the Terminal Services server as user B, the session will have access to the drives according to A’s permissions.

Drives can also be mapped like a network drive. The client drives are accessible as \\TSCLIENT\C. Note the client workstation’s machine name is not used, it is always referenced with the generic name TSCLIENT.

To display the files on TSCLIENT:

DIR \\TSCLIENT\C

So you can map a drive as follows:

NET USE Y: \\TSCLIENT\C

or simply use the Universal Naming Convention (UNC) syntax:

COPY \\TSCLIENT\C\MYDIR\*.XLS D:\DOCUMENTS\ 

example:

ROBOCOPY \\TSCLIENT\C\MYDIR D:\DOCUMENTS *.XLS /Z /ETA

ROBOCOPY \\TSCLIENT\C\MYDIR D:\DOCUMENTS *.* /MIR /Z /ETA /r:1 /w:1 /Log+:d:\log.txt

 

Note: If you receive an “Attempt to access invalid address” error when using the UNC path \\tsclient\c, then the problem is on the client side.

Likely, the Windows firewall is turned on and blocking file shares, or “File and Printer Sharing For Microsoft Networks” is turned off in the NIC properties, the Server service is disabled, or simple file sharing is enabled on the client