Category: Windows Server/Client


Windows 2003 Supports:

  • SNMPv2x

Windows 2008 Supports:

  • SNMPv1 and SNMPv2

Windows 2012 does not Support SNMP:

  • SNMP is deprecated. Instead, use the Common Information Model (CIM), which is supported by the WS-Management web services protocol and implemented as Windows Remote Management.

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa384426(v=vs.85).aspx

Test if SNMP devices are responding correctly to SNMP queries:

https://support.panorama9.com/hc/en-us/articles/203568188-Test-if-SNMP-devices-are-responding-correctly-to-SNMP-queries

Advertisements

What’s new in ADFS 2016?

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server-docs/identity/ad-fs/overview/whats-new-active-directory-federation-services-windows-server-2016?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

  • Eliminate Passwords from the Extranet
  • Sign in with Azure Multi-factor Authentication
  • Password-less Access from Compliant Devices
  • Sign in with Microsoft Passport
  • Secure Access to Applications
  • Better Sign in experience
  • Manageability and Operational Enhancements

You can upgrade an AD FS 2012 R2 farm using the “mixed farm” process described here. It works for WID or SQL farms, though the document shows only the WID scenario. Also another upgrade procedure:

  1. Active Directory schema update using ‘ADPrep’ with the Windows Server 2016 additions
  2. Build Windows Server 2016 servers with ADFS and install into the existing farm and add the servers to the Azure load balancer
  3. Promote one of the ADFS 2016 servers as “primary” of the farm, and point all other secondary servers to the new “primary”
  4. Build Windows Server 2016 servers with WAP and add the servers to the Azure load balancer
  5. Remove the WAP 2012 servers from the Azure load balancer
  6. Remove the ADFSv3 servers from the Azure load balancer
  7. Raise the Farm Behavior Level feature (FBL) to ‘2016’
  8. Remove the WAP servers from the cluster
  9. Upgrade the WebApplicationProxyConfiguration version to ‘2016’
  10. Configure ADFS 2016 to support Azure MFA and complete remaining configuration

https://blog.kloud.com.au/2017/01/20/adfs-v-3-0-2012-r2-migration-to-adfs-4-0-2016-part-1/

https://blog.kloud.com.au/2017/01/23/adfs-v-3-0-2012-r2-migration-to-adfs-4-0-2016-part-2/

https://blog.kloud.com.au/2017/01/25/wap-2012-r2-migration-to-wap-2016/

Other links:

http://www.mrchiyo.com/migrating-mixed-mode-ad-fs-full-windows-server-2016-ad-fs-farm/

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/identity/ad-fs/deployment/upgrading-to-ad-fs-in-windows-server

http://blog.ryanbetts.co.uk/2017/02/upgrade-adfs-30-to-40-with-windows.html

https://araihan.wordpress.com/2017/03/20/upgrading-ad-fs-to-windows-server-2016-fbl/

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/identity/ad-fs/deployment/upgrading-to-ad-fs-in-windows-server-2016

ADFS 2016 operations

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/identity/ad-fs/ad-fs-2016-operations

ADFS 2016 deployment

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/identity/ad-fs/ad-fs-deployment

ADFS 2016 design

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/identity/ad-fs/design/ad-fs-design-guide

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/windowsserver/2017/09/14/sneak-peek-4-introducing-project-honolulu-our-new-windows-server-management-experience/

 

RDS installation and HA procedure(s):

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/remote/remote-desktop-services/rds-scale-rdsh-farm

https://www.microsoftpressstore.com/articles/article.aspx?p=2346349&seqNum=4

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/remote/remote-desktop-services/rds-connection-broker-cluster

https://msfreaks.wordpress.com/2013/12/09/windows-2012-r2-remote-desktop-services-part-1

https://msfreaks.wordpress.com/2013/12/23/windows-2012-r2-remote-desktop-services-part-2

https://msfreaks.wordpress.com/2013/12/26/windows-2012-r2-remote-desktop-services-part-3

https://ryanmangansitblog.com/tag/high-availability/

Technet forum: https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-us/home?forum=winserverts

 

 

 

 

Introduction:

Event forwarding (also called SUBSCRIPTIONS) is a mean to send Windows event log entries from source computers to a collector. A same computer can be a collector or a source.

There are two methods available to complete this challenge – collector initiated and source initiated:

Parameter Collector Initiated (PULL) Source Initiated (PUSH)
Socket direction (for firewall rules) Collector –> Source Collector –> Source
Initiating machine Collector Source
Authentication Type Kerberos Kerberos / Certificates

This technology uses WinRM (HTTP protocol on port TCP 5985 with WinRM 2.0) . Be careful with the Window firewall and configure it to allow WinRM incoming requests.

WinRM is the ‘server’ component and WinRS is the ‘client’ that can remotely manage the machine with WinRM configured.

Differences you should be aware of:

WinRM 1.1 (obsolete)
Vista and Server 2008
Port 80 for HTTP and Port 443 for HTTPS

WinRM 2.0
Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2, 2012 R2 …
Port 5985 for HTTP and Port 5986 for HTTPS

Reference for WEF and event forwarding:

Deploying WinRM using Group Policy: http://www.vkernel.ro/blog/how-to-enable-winrm-http-via-group-policy

Microsoft official document well documented:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/threat-protection/use-windows-event-forwarding-to-assist-in-instrusion-detection

https://www.jpcert.or.jp/english/pub/sr/ir_research.html

Fresh How-to from Intrusion detection perspective:

https://medium.com/@palantir/windows-event-forwarding-for-network-defense-cb208d5ff86f

How-to easy to follow from Intrusion detection perspective:

https://www.root9b.com/sites/default/files/whitepapers/R9B_blog_005_whitepaper_01.pdf

https://joshuadlewis.blogspot.fr/2014/10/advanced-threat-detection-with-sysmon_74.html same than previous one but more appendix

From Intrusion detection perspective:

https://hackernoon.com/the-windows-event-forwarding-survival-guide-2010db7a68c4 help to manage error of WEF deployment

Basic configuration:

on source computers and collector computer:  winrm quickconfig     and add the collector computer account to the local administrators group

To verify a listener has been created type winrm enumerate winrm/config/listener

WinRM Client Setup

Just to round off this quick introduction to WinRM, to delete a listener use winrm delete winrm/config/listener?address=*+Transport=HTTP

on collector computer: wecutil qc. Add the computer account of the collector computer to the Event Log Readers Group on each of the source computers

on collector computer: create a new subscription from event viewer (follow the wizard)

WinRS: WinRS (Windows Remote Shell) is the client that connects to a WinRM configured machine (as seen in the first part of this post). WinRS is pretty handy, you’ve probably used PSTools or SC for similar things in the past. Here are a few examples of what you do.

Connecting to a remote shell
winrs -r:http://hostnameofclient "cmd"
Stop / Starting remote service
winrs -r:http://hostnameofclient "net start/stop spooler"
Do a Dir on the C drive
winrs -r:http://hostnameofclient "dir c:\"

WinRS

Forwarded Event Logs:

This is configured using ‘subscribers’, which connect to WinRM enabled machines.

To configure these subscribers head over to event viewer, right click on forwarded events and select properties. Select the 2nd tab along subscriptions and press create.

This is where you’ll select the WinRM enabled machine and choose which events you would like forwarded.

Subscriptions

Right click the subscription and select show runtime status.

Error 0x80338126

Now it took me a minute or two to figure this one out. Was it a firewall issue (this gives the same error code), did I miss some configuration steps? Well no, it was something a lot more basic than that. Remember earlier on we were talking about the port changes in WinRM 1.1 to 2.0?

That’s right, I was using server 2008 R2 to set the subscriptions which automatically sets the port to 5985. The client I configured initially was server 2008 so uses version 1.1. If you right click the subscription and click properties -> advanced you’ll be able to see this. I changed this to port 80 and checked the runtime status again.

[DC2.domain.local] – Error – Last retry time: 03/02/2011 20:20:30. Code (0x5): Access is denied. Next retry time: 03/02/2011 20:25:30.”

Head back to the advanced settings and change the user account from machine account to a user with administrative rights. After making these changes the forwarded events started to flow.

Subscriptions Advanced

Additional considerations:

In a workgroup environment, you can follow the same basic procedure described above to configure computers to forward and collect events. However, there are some additional steps and considerations for workgroups:

  • You can only use Normal mode (Pull) subscriptions
  • You must add a Windows Firewall exception for Remote Event Log Management on each source computer.
  • You must add an account with administrator privileges to the Event Log Readers group on each source computer. You must specify this account in the Configure Advanced Subscription Settings dialog when creating a subscription on the collector computer.
  • Type winrm set winrm/config/client @{TrustedHosts="<sources>"} at a command prompt on the collector computer to allow all of the source computers to use NTLM authentication when communicating with WinRM on the collector computer. Run this command only once. Where <sources> appears in the command, substitute a list of the names of all of the participating source computers in the workgroup. Separate the names by commas. Alternatively, you can use wildcards to match the names of all the source computers. For example, if you want to configure a set of source computers, each with a name that begins with “msft”, you could type this command winrm set winrm/config/client @{TrustedHosts="msft*"} on the collector computer. To learn more about this command, type winrm help config.

If you configure a subscription to use the HTTPS protocol by using the HTTPS option in Advanced Subscription Settings , you must also set corresponding Windows Firewall exceptions for port 443. For a subscription that uses Normal (PULL mode) delivery optimization, you must set the exception only on the source computers. For a subscription that uses either Minimize Bandwidth or Minimize Latency (PUSH mode) delivery optimizations, you must set the exception on both the source and collector computers.

If you intend to specify a user account by using the Specific User option in Advanced Subscription Settings when creating the subscription, you must ensure that account is a member of the local Administrators group on each of the source computers in step 4 instead of adding the machine account of the collector computer. Alternatively, you can use the Windows Event Log command-line utility to grant an account access to individual logs. To learn more about this command-line utility, type wevtutil sl -? at a command prompt.

References:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/jepayne/archive/2015/11/24/monitoring-what-matters-windows-event-forwarding-for-everyone-even-if-you-already-have-a-siem.aspx

http://blogs.technet.com/b/jepayne/archive/2015/11/20/what-should-i-know-about-security-the-massive-list-of-links-post.aspx

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc748890.aspx

http://windowsitpro.com/security/q-what-are-some-simple-tips-testing-and-troubleshooting-windows-event-forwarding-and-collec

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc749140.aspx

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askperf/archive/2010/09/24/an-introduction-to-winrm-basics.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa384372(v=vs.85).aspx

Video:

Tutorials:

1st: Event forwarding between computers in a Domain

http://tutorial.programming4.us/windows_7/Forwarding-Events-(part-1)—How-to-Configure-Event-Forwarding-in-AD-DS-Domains.aspx

2nd: Event forwarding between computers in workgroup

http://tutorial.programming4.us/windows_7/Forwarding-Events-(part-2)—How-to-Troubleshoot-Event-Forwarding—How-to-Configure-Event-Forwarding-in-Workgroup-Environments.aspx

Additional article talking about Event forwarding too:

http://joshuadlewis.blogspot.fr/2014/10/advanced-threat-detection-with-sysmon_74.html

 

Behind this catchy title is a real need. As a system administrator, it may be worthwhile to audit all of your organization’s Active Directory accounts to assess the level of security for user accounts. Let’s see how we do it!

Web resources and Methods:

Source: http://thehackernews.com/2017/07/windows-10-ubuntu-linux.html

Windows and Linux in the same line? Yes, you heard that right… and that too, on the same computer and within the same operating system.

Two months ago, Microsoft announced its plans to let its users install three different flavours of the Linux operating system – Ubuntu, Fedora, and SUSE – directly through their Windows Store, allowing them to run Windows and Linux apps side-by-side.

Now, downloading an entire operating system has just become as easy as downloading an application with the availability of popular Linux distro ‘Ubuntu’ in the Windows App Store.

However, unlike a conventional Ubuntu installation, this Ubuntu version runs in a sandboxed alongside Windows 10 with limited interaction with the operating system and is focused on running regular command-line utilities like bash or SSH as a standalone installation through an Ubuntu Terminal.

For now, Ubuntu is currently only available to Windows 10 Insiders users and would be made available to the public with the upcoming Windows 10 Fall Creator Update, which is expected to release in September/October 2017.

Here’s How to Install and Run Ubuntu on Windows 10

Users registered in Windows 10 Insiders Program with at least “Build 16215” installed can directly install Ubuntu from the Windows Store, which will allow them to “use Ubuntu Terminal and run Ubuntu command line utilities including bash, ssh, git, apt and many more.”

After installing Ubuntu, Windows 10 users will require enabling “Windows Subsystem for Linux” that was previously added to Windows 10.

How to

http://www.numerama.com/tech/158150-le-shell-bash-sous-windows-10-ce-quil-faut-savoir.html

 

To detect lateral movement on Windows infrastructure I recommend to collect the following events:

It’s based on events (4648 + 4672 from member servers, 8004 from DCs) + network traffic (AS/TGS).

Regarding both event 4648 (A logon was attempted using explicit credentials) and event 4672 (Special privileges assigned to new logon):
=> Collect events and send to a SIEM (splunk, logrythm …) or even Windows Event collector (WEF)

Reference for WEF and event forwarding:

Deploying WinRM using Group Policy: http://www.vkernel.ro/blog/how-to-enable-winrm-http-via-group-policy

Microsoft official document well documented:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/threat-protection/use-windows-event-forwarding-to-assist-in-instrusion-detection

https://www.jpcert.or.jp/english/pub/sr/ir_research.html

Fresh How-to from Intrusion detection perspective:

https://medium.com/@palantir/windows-event-forwarding-for-network-defense-cb208d5ff86f

How-to easy to follow from Intrusion detection perspective:

https://www.root9b.com/sites/default/files/whitepapers/R9B_blog_005_whitepaper_01.pdf

https://joshuadlewis.blogspot.fr/2014/10/advanced-threat-detection-with-sysmon_74.html same than previous one but more appendix

From Intrusion detection perspective:

https://hackernoon.com/the-windows-event-forwarding-survival-guide-2010db7a68c4 help to manage error of WEF deployment

 

ANSSI AD control paths:

https://github.com/ANSSI-FR/AD-control-paths

Lucas Bouillot, Emmanuel Gras – ANSSI – 2014 Presented at the French conference SSTIC-2014. Slides and paper can be found here: https://www.sstic.org/2014/presentation/chemins_de_controle_active_directory/.

 

Disabling SMB v1 (lanmanserver “server service only”) on windows computers/servers:

Full version: https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/staysafe/2017/05/17/disable-smb-v1-in-managed-environments-with-ad-group-policy/

 

My recommendation:

a) for domain-based computers: use GPO “group policy object” to deploy the registry key to disable SMBv1 (server-side only) protocol on all systems (A reboot is required to take effect)

 

b) for isolated computer or non/domain joined computers: use the following command line to modify the lanmanserver registry key properly

 

Implementation – Technical details:

 

a) for domain-based computers, create a GPO or modify an existing GPO applied to computers only, to add the following registry key:

 

for domain-based computers, to create the GPO setting to disable SMB v1, use GPMC, Computer configuration, preferences, windows settings, registry, right-click, new registry item,

 

keep: Update,

Select the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Parameters

 

Value: SMB1

Data: REG_DWORD 0

 

Note: To re-enable it

REG_DWORD: 1 = Enabled

Default: 1 = Enabled

 

 

b) for isolated computer or non/domain joined computers:

 

b.1) For Windows 8 and Windows server 2012 or greater (Note: not supported on Windows 7):

To obtain the current state of the SMB server protocol configuration, run the following cmdlet:

 

Get-SmbServerConfiguration | Select EnableSMB1Protocol

 

To disable SMBv1 on the SMB server, run the following cmdlet:

 

Set-SmbServerConfiguration -EnableSMB1Protocol $false

 

b.2) For Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista, and Windows Server 2008

 

To enable or disable SMB protocols on an SMB Server that is running Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista, or Windows Server

2008, use Windows PowerShell or Registry Editor.

 

To disable SMBv1 on the SMB server, run the following cmdlet:

 

Set-ItemProperty –Path “HKLM:\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Parameters” SMB1 -Type DWORD -Value 0 –Force

 

To assess the impact:

 

This article contain a table to understand what version you will end up, depending on what Windows version is running as the SMB client and what version of Windows is running as the SMB server.

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/josebda/2012/06/06/windows-server-2012-which-version-of-the-smb-protocol-smb-1-0-smb-2-0-smb-2-1-or-smb-3-0-are-you-using-on-your-file-server/

 

 

This article contain a table to understand what version you will end up, depending on what Windows version is running as the SMB client and what version of Windows is running as the SMB server.

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/josebda/2012/06/06/windows-server-2012-which-version-of-the-smb-protocol-smb-1-0-smb-2-0-smb-2-1-or-smb-3-0-are-you-using-on-your-file-server/